How to make soft, lump-free Ragi Mudde (Step by Step Recipe)

How to make soft, lump-free Ragi Mudde (Step by Step Recipe)

Ragi Mudde is a healthy, traditional recipe from Karnataka made using ragi flour/finger millet flour. It is very good for weight loss, diabetic-friendly, kids-friendly and can be served for lunch, dinner or also for breakfast.

Ragi Mudde

I bought my ragi flour along with other products from Spice Village Berlin with free home delivery as well.

If you are living in Europe, don’t forget to click on the link above to buy your Indian groceries with a 5% discount on your order using the coupon code ‘CULINARYPEACE’.

What is Ragi Mudde?

Ragi Mudde or Ragi ball is a super nutritious dish popular in Karnataka and also in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh with different names. However, the recipes differ slightly.

The traditional Karnataka style ragi mudde is made only with ragi flour without adding rice unlike the ones from the other states.

I learned this recipe from my mom. Having grown up eating this regularly, I have a very fond liking towards ragi mudde and make it often too.

Just like my mom, I also prefer adding a little ghee while making this as it not only enhances the taste but also aids in better digestion of ragi.

Health benefits of Ragi

Ragi is known to be rich in iron, calcium, fiber and aids weight-loss, keeps the body cool and also, one of the most recommended grains for people with diabetes.

Ragi keeps you full for longer and hence, is one of the best choices of grains for your everyday diet. You can make Soft Ragi Rotti (click on the link for recipe), Ragi Dosa, Ragi Mudde and a lot more dishes using ragi flour.

Tips to make soft, lump-free ragi mudde

1. First of all, use a good quality and fresh ragi flour to make this. An old stock can smell bad and also taste bad.

2. I always prefer to sieve the ragi flour before making this. This helps in avoiding any small lumps present in the flour and also remove the coarse particles.

3. The quantity of water varies based on the quality of ragi flour. Very fine ragi flour needs less water than the coarsely ground ragi flour.

4. Therefore, start with 1:1.5 (ragi: water) ratio initially and then add more water if required.

5. After completely cooking the ragi flour, if it is too dry, remember to sprinkle only hot water to get the dough of right consistency.

6. To avoid lumps, use a mudde kolu (as we say in Kannada), which is a thick wooden stick, to mix the ragi flour. If not, use the round bottom part of a wooden spatula/ladle.

This helps in breaking the lumps.

7. Rock salt also helps in breaking the lumps.

8. While mixing the ragi flour, apply a good amount of force and vigorously mix the flour for at least 5 minutes. This helps in getting the soft ragi mudde and also to break the lumps.

ragi mudde

How do I know if the ragi flour is cooked well? 

After cooking the ragi flour in water and mixing well, you will have to check if it is well cooked and ready.

Uncooked / half-cooked ragi mudde might not be digested well and could upset your stomach.

Therefore, you have to make sure ragi flour is cooked well.

At one stage, the ragi flour mixture starts separating from your cookware and comes off easily as a big lump.

You can also check by dipping your fingers in water and touching the cooked ragi mudde. If it is non-sticky and you can form a ball, it is well cooked and ready.

How is ragi mudde served? 

Once you have made smooth balls out of the ragi flour mixture, make a small dent on top and add some ghee.

This is optional but I absolutely love eating it this way.

In rural Karnataka, it is just served plain with any kind of sambar or rasam varieties.

Ragi Mudde can also be served with Southekayi Hasi Gojju(cucumber raw curry)Mavinakayi Gojju (Mango Curry) or also with a dal variety like Mango Spinach Dal.

Ragi Mudde has to be just broken into smaller balls and dipped in any of the side dishes and simply swallowed in.

{A little secret- I haven’t yet learned the art of swallowing mudde and I end up partially chewing it. I somehow like relishing the taste more by chewing, haha :P}

Step by step method

Note: 1 cup = 240 ml (standard measurement)

Step 1:

Add 1 cup water to a saucepan / thick bottom pan. To this add salt, 2 drops of ghee/oil. On high heat, bring this to a gentle boil by closing this with a lid/plate.

Step 2:

Meanwhile, mix 1 tbsp of ragi flour with the remaining 0.5 cup water to make a lump-free slurry (mixture). This makes it 1.5 cups of water in total.

Once the water in the saucepan comes to a gentle boil (becomes slightly warm), pour this ragi slurry and mix well.

Step 3:

Let this mixture now come to a rolling boil, (it should start boiling well) and almost about to overflow.

Just at this point reduce the heat to medium and pour the remaining ragi flour (1 cup). Immediately place a lid/plate on top and let this cook for 4-5 minutes on medium-high heat.

 

Step 4:

Next, using a wooden stick or the round bottom part of a wooden spatula, apply good amount of force and vigorously mix the content in the saucepan well. Break the lumps at this stage. Mixing takes about 3-5 minutes.

Step 5:

Bring the heat to low, cover the pan with a plate again and let this cook a bit more, for about 2-3 minutes. Mix again if there are lumps.

Next, take off the saucepan from the stove and let the ragi mixture cook for some more time, say 2 minutes.

Step 6:

If the ragi mixture is cooked well and is of the right consistency, it will immediately form a lump and comes together.

To check, dip your fingers in cold water and touch the mixture. It should be non-sticky and you should be able to shape it into a small ball.

Step 7:

Grease a plate with a tsp of ghee/oil (optional, but recommended to use ghee). Transfer the cooked ragi mixture onto the greased plate and divide it into 2 or 3 portions based on your preferred size of ragi mudde.

Roll gently and shape them to form ragi balls, by dipping your palm in cold water.

Note: The mixture will be very hot. So, dip your palm in cold water, before making the ragi balls. If you can’t still handle it, let this become warm and then form balls. 

Other Karnataka recipes that might interest you:

Soft Ragi Rotti

Mysore Dosa Recipe

Kodubale Recipe

I hope you give this recipe a try and enjoy it as much as I enjoyed preparing it and writing it down for you all.

I would love to hear your feedback on this. When you try it, kindly post your valuable comments below or share it with me personally on Instagram Facebook. You may also pin it on Pinterest

Pin the recipe for later

Ragi mudde

Disclaimer: This post contains an affiliate link. When you make a purchase from this link, I will earn a small commission with no extra cost for you. 

How to make soft, lump-free Ragi Mudde (Step by Step Recipe)

Ragi Mudde is a healthy recipe from Karnataka made using ragi or finger millet flour. It is very good for weight loss, is diabetic-friendly, kids-friendly.
Course Breakfast, Dinner, Lunch
Cuisine Indian, Karnataka
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 medium size
Author Praneetha A Goutham

Ingredients

  • 1 cup ragi flour - (finger millet flour)
  • 1.5-2 cups water - (refer notes)
  • salt - to taste
  • 1 tsp ghee - (or oil)

Instructions

  • Add 1 cup water to a saucepan / thick bottom pan. To this add salt, 2 drops of ghee/oil. On high heat, bring this to a gentle boil by closing this with a lid/plate.
  • Meanwhile, mix 1 tbsp of ragi flour with the remaining 0.5 cup water to make a lump-free slurry (mixture). This makes it 1.5 cups of water in total. 
  • Once the water in the saucepan comes to a gentle boil (becomes slightly warm), pour this ragi slurry and mix well. Let this mixture now come to a rolling boil, (it should start boiling well).
  • Just at this point reduce the heat to medium and pour the remaining ragi flour (1 cup). Immediately place a lid/plate on top and let this cook for 4-5 minutes on medium-high heat.
  • Next, using a wooden stick or the round bottom part of a wooden spatula, apply good amount of force and vigorously mix the content in the saucepan well. Break the lumps at this stage. Mixing takes about 3-5 minutes.
  • Bring the heat to low, cover the pan with a plate again and let this cook a bit more, for about 2-3 minutes. Mix again if there are lumps. 
  • Next, take off the saucepan from the stove and let the ragi mixture cook for some more time, say 2 minutes. 
  • If the ragi mixture is cooked well and is of the right consistency, it will immediately form a lump and comes together.  To check, dip your fingers in cold water and touch the mixture. It should be non-sticky and you should be able to shape it into a small ball. 
  • Grease a plate with a tsp of ghee/oil. Transfer the cooked ragi mixture onto the greased plate and divide it into 2 or 3 portions based on your preferred size of ragi mudde. 
  • Roll gently and shape them to form ragi balls, by dipping your palm in cold water.  Ragi Mudde is now ready to serve with any curry/sambar/rasam of your choice.

Notes

  1. Always use fresh ragi flour and sieve your flour in case it is an old stock.
  2. The quantity of water varies based on the quality of ragi flour. Very fine ragi flour needs lesser water than the coarsely ground ragi flour.
  3. The ragi flour I used needed only 1.5 cups water. However you might need between 1.5 to 2 cups of water based on your ragi flour.
  4. Therefore, I suggest you start with 1:1.5 (ragi: water) ratio initially and then add more water if required.
  5. While shaping the ragi balls if you find it to be hard, sprinkle some hot water. If it is watery sprinkle some ragi flour.
  6. However, adding too much raw ragi flour is not good as it will be uncooked and not good on your stomach. Therefore, be careful while adding water and avoid adding raw ragi flour later.
  7. If at all you still find lumps while shaping the balls, break them and mix. If there are too many of them, discard the lumps. (shouldn't be the case if you follow the tips above)
  8. If you are complete beginner, I suggest you start with just 1/2 cup ragi flour and try making 1 or 2 small ragi mudde. Once you learn the method, you can increase the quantity.
  9. For a vegan version, skip ghee and use oil instead or skip it altogether.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating