Kodubale Recipe | Kodbale Recipe | Karnataka Snack Kodubale

Kodubale Recipe | Kodbale Recipe | Karnataka Snack Kodubale

Kodubale is a traditional snack from Karnataka. It is a spicy, crispy snack dish that can be done as your monsoon snack or for festivals like Krishna Janmashtami and Ganesh Chathurthi.

Kodubale comes from two Kannada words- ‘kodu’ (meaning horn) and ‘bale’ (meaning bangle). Since kodubale mimics the shape of a bangle and is made by pressing two ends (horn-like ends) of the dough, I assume they are named so.

Kodubale

How does a perfect Kodubale taste like?

When it comes to kodubale, there are many different variations in the recipe.

The store-bought ones are usually with no much flavor and the texture is usually powdery and either too hard or too soft. However, according to me, there is a specific taste and texture that defines a perfect kodubale.

I remember my elders always mentioning that a perfect authentic kodubale should have the taste and flavor of fresh coconut and asafoetida in every bite. Ingu-Thengu as we say in Kannada.

It has to be crispy, but not hard, not soft at all, and should have the right crunch in every bite.

It should NOT be powdery, rubbery, soggy.

Kodubale

I have grown up eating kodubale made by mom, aunts, grandmother, and other relatives. But, there is a small family-run business in Mysuru that makes the best and the ‘perfect’ kodubale, in all aspects as mentioned above.

If you are looking for a perfect kodubale recipe, try the measurements and the procedure exactly as I have explained below and I am sure you would not be disappointed.

I have written a detailed method below with tips and mistakes to avoid as per my own experience, which I think will be useful for everybody.

Mistakes to avoid while making Kodubale

  1. After preparing the mixture to make the dough, do not mix the entire mixture with water. Divide it into 2 portions and mix the first portion with water as required and knead well to form the dough. Once you are almost done making kodubale from this mixture, use the second portion to make the dough. This is required because, if the dough (after adding water) is rested for too long, the kodubale will turn soggy and drink too much oil.
  2. Before starting to fry the kodubale, make sure you have shaped them all and are ready. This way you can save some time, maintain the right temperature of the oil throughout.
  3. Always use a deep bottomed wide kadai / frying pan to fry. Otherwise, the kodubale can settle at the base of the kadai and get slightly burnt.
  4. Do not shape the kodubale too thin or thick. If it is too thin, they can end up being hard and if they are thick, they can get undercooked and become soggy.
  5. Keep the heat in low-medium so that the kodubale gets cooked uniformly. If not, they will brown quickly on the outside and remain undercooked from the inside.
  6. Do not put too many kodubale at once. Fry small batches at a time, as per the size of your frying pan.

Some useful tips and suggestions

  1. You can also store the mixture without the coconut paste and water for a long time since it is just a mixture of flours, salt and asafoetida. When you want to make kodubale, you can grind coconut and red chillies and add this to the mixture.
  2. As you roll the dough to make kodubale, they can crack and it is completely ok. Just make sure you knead it again, shape them into balls and roll them gently. Do not apply too much force while rolling.
  3. As soon as you put the raw kodubale into the oil, you will notice sizzling sound and bubbles in the oil. As the kodubale gets cooked uniformly, this sizzling sound and the bubbles will disappear. This is the point at which you should remove the kodubale from the oil.
  4. Anytime sooner or later from this point will yield soft or hard kodubales respectively.
  5. When the kodubale is hot and just out of oil, it will be a bit soft from the inside. So eat it only after a few minutes to enjoy the right texture.
  6. Please make sure you follow the measurements exactly especially with adding coconut. Too much coconut will yield kodubale that are soft on the inside and we want crunchy ones.

Kodubale

Step-by-step procedure to make Kodubale

Please note: 1 cup=250ml (standard measurement)

1. Grind coconut and red chilies to a coarse paste adding very little water. Keep this aside.

2. Heat a pan on medium heat and slightly warm up both maida and chiroti rava. This can be done together.

3. Transfer these to a wide mixing bowl. To this, add rice flour, salt to taste, asafoetida, ajwain seeds, ground coconut mixture and combine everything well.

4. Heat 2-3 tablespoons of oil in a small wok until it is piping hot. Carefully pour this hot oil into the mixture prepared above. Using a spoon mix the oil and the dough mixture well. The mixture should be in such a way that it holds the shape.

5. Divide the mixture into 2 small portions. Add water as required to one portion. Knead well. You should make a smooth but firm dough (softer than chapati dough). So, add water accordingly.

6. Divide this kneaded portion of the dough into small balls (small lemon size or big gooseberry size). Using your palm roll the dough into a slightly thick rod-like structure. Bring both the ends of this together and press the ends gently. Now you will get a circular-shaped kodubale dough.

7. Similarly, shape all the divided dough balls into kodubale and keep them ready as you heat the oil in a big deep kadai/ frying pan.

8. Once the oil is hot, put in a small piece of dough to make sure the oil is at the right temperature. The dough ball should immediately come up to the surface of the oil. Now, you are sure the oil is heated well.

9. Reduce the heat to low-medium and gently slide in the prepared kodubale rings into the hot oil. The oil will start sizzling and you will notice bubbles.

10. Fry the kodubale in low-medium heat making sure they are evenly getting cooked. Once the sizzling of the oil (bubbles in oil) almost stops, your kodubale is cooked completely. Take them off the oil and put them on a kitchen paper.

The recipe was adapted from Swayampaaka YouTube channel.

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Kodubale

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Please note: 1 cup=250ml (standard measurement)

Kodubale Recipe | Kodbale Recipe | Karnataka Special Kodubale

Kodubale is a traditional Karnataka snack that is crispy, spicy and utterly delicious. Follow the recipe exactly to make perfect fail-proof kodubale to serve with a cup of coffee or tea as an evening snack.
Course Snack
Cuisine Indian, Karnataka
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 20 numbers
Author Praneetha A Goutham

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rice flour - (akki hittu)
  • 1/4 cup chiroti rava - (very fine rava)
  • 1/4 cup maida - (all purpose flour)
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida - (ingu, hing)
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil - (hot oil)
  • as required cooking oil - , for deep-frying
  • 1/4 tsp ajwain seeds - (om kaalu),
  • salt - to taste

To grind

  • 1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
  • 5-6 nos. guntur red chillies - (spicy variety)

Instructions

To grind

  • Grind coconut and red chillies to a coarse paste adding very little water. Keep this aside

Preparing the Kodubale mixture

  • Heat a pan on medium heat and slightly warm up both maida and chiroti rava. This can be done together.
  • Transfer these to a wide mixing bowl. To this, add rice flour, salt to taste, asafoetida, ajwain seeds, ground coconut mixture and mix everything well.
  • Heat 2-3 tablespoons of oil in a small wok until it is piping hot. Carefully pour this hot oil into the mixture prepared above. Using a spoon mix the oil and the dough mixture well.
  • Divide the mixture into 2 small portions. Add water as required to one portion. Knead well. You should make a smooth but firm dough (softer than chapati dough). So, add water accordingly.
  • Divide this kneaded portion of the dough into small balls (small lemon size or big gooseberry size). Using your palm roll the dough into a slightly thick rod-like structure. Bring both the ends of this together and press the ends gently. Now you will get a circular-shaped kodubale dough.
  • Similarly shape all the divided dough balls into kodubale and keep them ready as you heat the oil in a big deep kadai.

Frying the Kodubale

  • Once the oil is hot, put in a small piece of dough to make sure the oil is at the right temperature. The dough ball should immediately come up to the surface of the oil. Now, you are sure the oil is heated well.
  • Reduce the heat to low-medium and gently slide in the prepared kodubale rings into the hot oil. Do not overcrowd the kadai with too many kodubale at once.
  • Fry the kodubale in low-medium heat making sure they are evenly getting cooked. Once the sizzling of the oil (bubbles in oil) almost stops, your kodubale is cooked completely. Take them off the oil and put them on a kitchen paper.
  • Similarly, mix the other half of the dough mixture with water to make a smooth soft dough and make kodubale as above.
  • Once all the kodubale are completely cool, store them in a dry airtight container up 20-25 days.

Notes

  1. Alter the number of chillies as per your taste. If you use byadagi or Kashmiri variety (less spicy), you will have to use more than specified here.
  2. Do not add ajwain seeds more than mentioned here. It is tolerable up to 1/2 tsp, but more than that will be too strong in taste and can become bitter.
  3. You can use a few curry leaves while making the coconut chilly mixture.
  4. You can make small or big kodubales, as per your liking. But if the size of your kodubale is big, make sure the frying pan you are using is wide.
  5. Lastly, use asafoetida and coconut exactly as mentioned above. More the coconut, softer the kodubale will become. More the asafoetida, bitter will be the taste.



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